Center for Creative Retirement

We offer more educational and fun classes, trips and workshops to keep you actively engaged.

How to Register

  • Register online by selecting "Add to Cart" on the desired course(s) and select "Cart" at the bottom of the page when you are ready to process your registration.
    • The “Seats Left” information is updated every hour and when you checkout.
  • Other registration options are available.

Courses

A Visit to Mabee Farm Historic Site

The Mabee Farm Historic Site, part of the Schenectady County Historical Society, is the oldest house still standing in the Mohawk Valley.  It is also the oldest farm in the Mohawk Valley (1705).  The site offers visitors vibrant educational and recreational opportunities. With its deep history and riverside beauty, it’s the perfect place to explore Mohawk Valley heritage. You will walk across weathered pine floors in the home of settlers Jan and Annetje. Say hello to our resident farm animals. Explore the hand-pegged Dutch Barn (1760s) or just meander through our orchards, gardens, and forest trails. Tied to the dock or parked behind the Dutch Barn sits our reproduction 18th century bateaux, the De Sagar and the Bobbie U, giving visitors an idea of how goods were shipped up and down the river. Our special visit will feature a house tour, a blacksmith demo and a barn building demo. Course fee includes $10 materials fee.

Michael Diana, Instructor

Paula Johannesen, Coordinator

A Visit to Mabee Farm Historic Site
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Saturday, 4/24
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-554 600 4 seats left $20

Anne Sullivan Macy- Helen Keller's Teacher

As a child in late 19th century America, Anne Sullivan couldn’t have had the odds stacked against her any higher: a child of a poverty-stricken Irish family in Massachusetts, she was orphaned when her mother died and her father deserted the family, and was nearly blind from the effects of the eye disease trachoma. Sent to a gruesome poorhouse for six years, she finally managed to gain assistance to enter the Perkins School of the Blind and graduate as its valedictorian four years later. Resentful and argumentative, she seemed an unlikely candidate to succeed in liberating a seven-year old Helen Keller from her Deaf-Blind prison, but in doing so, both she and Helen flourished: Helen as a writer and activist, and Anne, with her innovative methodology of teaching people with disabilities.

Phyllis Chapman, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Anne Sullivan Macy- Helen Keller's Teacher
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/14
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-336 600 0 seats left $37Section Full

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Artifacts and Stories from History

Do you know about a very compassionate president of the United States or, for that matter, who was the man who was really the first president of the United States? (It’s not who you think.) Ever hear about some local amusement parks of the past? How about the grand mansions? In this course you will see many actual historical items from the area and hear stories of local places and events. Sprinkled into the presentation are also stories from the history of our country, stories of people, places, and events that are familiar to many Americans. You will walk away with a wealth of stories and a lot of knowledge that you never knew you had been missing. Our Malta location is located in the Tec-Smart building at 345 Hermes Road.

Rick Reynolds, Instructor

Course will meet in Tec-Smart, Room 202

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Artifacts and Stories from History
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 3/30
12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
ZCCR-643 600 0 seats left $12Section Full

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Back to Basics - Beginning Genealogy

Get back to basics with professional genealogist Lisa Dougherty!  Whether you are just starting out, or want to sharpen your genealogy skills, this is the program for you. Learn how to begin your genealogy experience with suggestions for research you can do close to home, then learn about the basic records that all family historians use to fill in their family tree. Starting out with a solid foundation is the key to a successful journey into your family’s history!

Lisa Dougherty, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Back to Basics - Beginning Genealogy
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 3/23
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-638 600 7 seats left $15

Back to Basics - Using Ancestry.com for Your Family History

Get back to basics with professional genealogist Lisa Dougherty!  Ancestry.com is the internet’s largest genealogy website, with 15 million+ DNA testers and over 3 million subscribers worldwide as of 2017.  Its many features can be a great advantage to those researching their family history, but all that information can also be confusing and intimidating.  Lisa, an experienced Ancestry user,  will help you find out what exactly Ancestry.com has to offer, how to perform effective searches, how to find the information you are looking for, and how to create an online family tree that is both accurate and interesting enough to share!

Lisa Dougherty, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Back to Basics - Using Ancestry.com for Your Family History
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/20
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-333 600 6 seats left $15

Birding for Beginners

Learn how to identify our feathered friends in this class for beginners. We will cover how to choose and use binoculars, field marks to look for to help in identification, and birding by sight and sound. We will be looking mostly for forest spring migrants.  Course fee includes $10 materials fee.

Lisa Hoyt, Instructor

Marie D’Entrone, Coordinator

Birding for Beginners
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 5/5
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-361 600 0 seats left $20Section Full

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Frankly, My Dear: The REEL Story Behind Gone With the Wind

“Gone With the Wind” has been called “the most magnificent motion picture of all time.” And millions of fans agree. But what most fans don’t know is that endless trouble and months of behind-the-scenes turmoil almost doomed “Gone With the Wind” to failure.  Explore the intriguing history of this iconic 1939 film, including the writing and publishing of Margaret Mitchell’s novel, the Hollywood frenzy of transforming the book into film, the Atlanta premiere, the Academy Awards, and more. This course is taught remotely via Zoom.  You will need your Hudson Valley username and password to access the course.

Computer System Access Information

Pauline Bartel, Instructor

 

Frankly, My Dear: The REEL Story Behind Gone With the Wind
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Saturday, 5/22
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
ZSPI-137 600 14 seats left $49

Hamilton's Choice

Jack Casey will discuss his new novel, Hamilton’s Choice, an in-depth view of the last three years of Alexander Hamilton’s life with a new theory about why he went to the fatal duel.  With many of the crucial events occurring in Albany, Mr. Casey will connect the 1801 duel of Hamilton’s son Philip, Thomas Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase, the 1804 New York governor’s race and how Gen. Philip Schuyler unwittingly gave Aaron Burr cause to summon Hamilton to his death on the dueling ground of Weehawken.

Jack Casey, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Hamilton's Choice
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 4/22
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-625 600 10 seats left $22

Knickerbocker Family Mansion: Ghosts, Tour and Lunch

The Knickerbocker Historical Society will be our hosts as they tell us about the history and ghosts of the Knickerbocker Mansion, which dates from about 1770. They will arrange for historical “ghosts” to give moving first-hand accounts of their lives and experiences, and they will explain the renovations – the not-for-profit Society rescued the mansion from certain demolition and has continued to restore it. Our visit concludes with a chance to tour the mansion and to a colonial lunch cooked with authentic recipes, a delicious side to the history of the mansion. Course fee includes $25 materials fee.

Jean Chenette, Coordinator

Knickerbocker Family Mansion: Ghosts, Tour and Lunch
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 5/19
10:30 am - 1:30 pm
ZCCR-137 600 0 seats left $35Section Full

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Let Those Meneely Bells Ring

Many have heard about them, some may have even seen a few, but the background of the Meneely bells in the Troy area is absolutely fascinating. Come get the scoop and hear all about them: what they were made of, how they were tuned, and where they are now. Find out the difference between a chime, a carillon and a peel. Gene Burns will share his experiences and knowledge.

Gene Burns, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Let Those Meneely Bells Ring
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Friday, 4/16
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-626 600 2 seats left $20

Life of New Netherland & Dutch Holiday

2 PRESENTATIONS. IN 1!

The Life and Legacy of New Netherland

New Netherland was a Dutch colony that existed in what is now New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey. This talk examines the history of the Dutch settlement of these areas during the 17th century, from Henry Hudson’s exploration of the Hudson River in 1609 through the English takeover of the colony in 1664. The discussion also examines the ways that Dutch culture, language, and traditions lingered long after the English takeover; some of them continue on to this day.

 

Dutch Holiday Traditions in Colonial Albany and the Hudson River Valley

During the 17th century, Dutch settlers to the Hudson River Valley brought Old World traditions and culture with them. Long after the English takeover of New Netherland, Dutch language, traditions, and customs lingered. In colonial New Netherland and New York, holiday traditions followed a familiar Dutch form, but often merged with other traditions as well. This lecture highlights the ways that Dutch holidays like Shrovetide (Carnival), Pinkster, and St. Nicholas Day were celebrated in Hudson Valley during the 17th and 18th centuries.

Sam Huntington, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Life of New Netherland & Dutch Holiday
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/21
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-628 600 0 seats left $15Section Full

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Murder & Mayhem in Stephentown

The region was shocked in December 1870 when blind 20-year-old Asa Kittle shot both his parents to death. Described by some as a “half idiot,” his ability to understand the charges against him was questioned.  This resulted in legislation in 1871 granting the court the discretion to determine if the prisoner is of sufficient soundness of mind “to undertake his defence.”  But Asa was the not the first, nor would he be the last, family member to be involved in a murderous scheme in eastern Rensselear County. Learn about some of the lawlessness that entangled other members of the family, its impact on the community, and what became of Asa.

Jill Knapp, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Murder & Mayhem in Stephentown
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/13
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-635 600 0 seats left $15Section Full

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New York Tales: Tall and True

The fifth session of this popular series will focus on New York’s connections to popular songs. You’ll hear a remarkable version of “Goodnight Irene” as Lead Belly might have sung it in his Albany concert, 12 years before it became the “The Weavers” #1 hit song of 1950 (and the oddball story of why it is so energetically sung by British soccer fans). You’ll learn the origins of “Tzena, Tzena, Tzena,” 1950’s #2 hit song (on the flip side of “Goodnight Irene”), as documented by New York’s Federal Court. We’ll pay homage to “The MacPherson Legacy to the City of Albany” and its connection to the song that everybody doesn’t know, “Auld Lang Syne.” For a change of pace, we’ll learn the local origins of that pandemic scarcity: toilet paper (and resolve the “over vs. under” controversy regarding the proper way to mount a roll of toilet paper). Some of New York State’s folklore is truly unbelievable. Some of its history is even more so!

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 112

Sandy Schuman, Instructor

New York Tales: Tall and True
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 4/8
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-558 600 1 seats left $22

Revolutionary History: America’s War for Independence

The Revolution is coming! We will explore the history of the American Revolution and the ways that this story still resonates in society today. In 2026, the nation will commemorate 250 years since the American colonies earned independence from the British Empire. In this class, we will focus on the start of the conflict to the American Victory at Saratoga. This course is taught remotely via Zoom.  You will need your Hudson Valley username and password to access the course.

Computer System Access Information

Sean Kelleher, Instructor

Revolutionary History: America’s War for Independence
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Monday, 3/22
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-644 600 1 seats left $10

Ronald Reagan: 40th President of the United States and So Much More

This class will delve into the life of Ronald Reagan before he became the nation’s 40th president, beginning with his earlier life growing up in a small town in rural Illinois. We will explore his early careers as a broadcaster, actor, union president, corporate pitch man and more before his entry onto the political scene, brought about by a famous speech he gave in support of another man running for president. That one speech would catapult him into electoral politics. You’ll learn how he upset the sitting governor of the largest state in the union, then won re-election four years later. Though he won the presidency in 1980, that was not his first time seeking the office.

 

Most importantly, we’ll explore his presidency in depth: the highs, the lows, and the man behind the policies. Ronald Reagan in the 1980’s evoked great sentiment. Many loved him, many hated him. You’ll learn about his legendary gift for public speaking using humor, nostalgia, and patriotism to convey a message. Ronald Reagan was no shrinking violet, and when he was president he was a lightning rod for both the left and the right. After leaving office he would pen a touching and poignant letter to the country announcing that he had a debilitating disease which would ultimately take his life. You’ll learn about the heartfelt emotion so many Americans displayed upon his passing. Love him or hate him, he became a larger-than-life presence and evoked a strong emotional response from many on all sides of the political spectrum, in the US and around the world.

Patrick Hogan, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

 

Ronald Reagan: 40th President of the United States and So Much More
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 5/5
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-642 600 6 seats left $12

Stitches in Time: A History of Ladies' Needlework

It was Mary Queen of Scots, imprisoned for most of her adult life, who made the practice of needlework popular throughout England. She kept her mind busy with elaborate embroidery that filled her lonely days. She would stitch symbols within her work that vented her depression and despair. Her ladies in waiting also began to take up needlework, which eventually spread to many upper class women in England by the 17th Century. Since America set its standards of etiquette, culture and aesthetics upon England, ladies’ needlework pictures copied England’s embroidery by the early 18th century. Because a lady’s sewing skills were so highly valued, special girls’ academies were opened throughout America to teach young women from wealthy families the skills they would need to run an affluent household. The all-important needlework pictures, samplers and mourning tributes were part of a young woman’s education and used to adorn the home and showcase her expertise. Specialty work on clothing and furnishing textiles were also an important aspect of needlework and will be illustrated on period costumes, accessories and furnishings for the home.

Marilyn Sassi, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 110

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Stitches in Time: A History of Ladies' Needlework
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Monday, 4/26
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-187 600 0 seats left $19Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

Susan B. Anthony: The Suffrage Struggle and the 19th Amendment

Susan B. Anthony returns from a long hiatus to relate the story of the struggle for women to earn the right to vote – from her era up to the successful ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1919. In 1920, 14 years after her death, women across America had full voting rights. Susan adds to her story of the early years of the fight for women’s rights: the right to own property, equal access to education and the professions – and full citizenship, including the right to vote. After the pioneers of the movement had passed, new voices: Carrie Chapman Catt, Frances Willard, Ida B. Wells, Harriot Stanton Blatch, and Alice Paul – made the last great push to the finish line, enduring hardships, including imprisonment. Their final efforts and determination led to the passage of the 19th Amendment, known as “The Susan B. Anthony Amendment.”

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 110

Phyllis Chapman, Instructor

Susan B. Anthony: The Suffrage Struggle and the 19th Amendment
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 3/24
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-645 600 6 seats left $37

Terrestrial Navigation Using Map and Compass

With map and compass in hand, never worry about losing your way again. Class will include basic introduction to using a compass and reading a trail and topographical map. After initial practice, you will have a chance to navigate a short course using your new skills.  Course fee includes $10 materials fee.

Lisa Hoyt, Instructor

Marie D’Entrone, Coordinator

Terrestrial Navigation Using Map and Compass
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/28
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-428 600 0 seats left $20Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

Textiles to Dye For: Textiles Used in America

In 17th century America, textiles were worth their weight in gold. Second only to precious metals and gems, textiles were listed at enormous values on household inventories. Using primary sources, this two-part series will begin in the 17th century and illustrate all the necessary fabrics within both wealthy and poor households. Included will be furnishings and clothing, all so highly prized that even rags were carefully collected. America’s production of both linen and wool was extremely time- consuming and labor-intensive, and the process of producing both will be fully illustrated, including all the many steps necessary, from harvesting to dyeing. Because of the amount of time involved, as soon as imported fabric became available at reasonable prices, it was viewed as a justifiable alternative. We will explore the history of textile imports, including the disparity between wealthy Americans who could afford to import fine silks, brocade and specially treated wool and the plight of the poor, who could only try to buy imported textiles secondhand.

 

The second part of this class will highlight the many advances in textile production, which began in England’s Industrial Revolution and spread to America by the late 18th century. One of the most important was the cotton gin, which made cotton an important American crop as it took to dye far better than linen. An unfortunate consequence of both England’s and America’s Industrial Revolution was the use of child labor from low-income families who desperately needed their children to work. Young children will be pictured in period photographs as they worked in many of America’s textile mills and cotton fields. Numerous examples of America’s printed textiles will be illustrated, along with a full history of bed covers, including, bed rugs, quilts and coverlets made into the late 19th century. Once aniline dye was discovered in England, these chemical colors were contrasted with the previously used natural dyes in America. The one textile that eluded both England and America was silk. Although many attempts were made to raise silkworms, they all eventually failed and silk continued to be imported through the late 19th century. Its history and production (sericulture) will be fully depicted.

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 110

Marilyn Sassi, Instructor

Textiles to Dye For: Textiles Used in America
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Mondays, 4/12 - 4/19
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-637 600 0 seats left $29Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

The Beauty, Design and Fragrance of Spring Flowers

How often do you get the opportunity to spend a morning with a versatile floral artist who can design a classical look but make it follow a modern trend? Take advantage of instructor Michele’s 30 plus years of experience and let her show you how you can put creativity and energy into designs and events. If you have been with us before you know she brings a passion for what she does and many return because they know she always brings new ideas and demonstrates what is “hot” in the flower world. You may be one of the lucky students who carries one of her creations home! Course fee includes a $14 materials fee.

Michele Peters, Instructor

Course will meet in Day Care Center, Room B05

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

The Beauty, Design and Fragrance of Spring Flowers
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/13
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-374 600 0 seats left $24Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

The Death of Rensselaer County Sheriff's Deputy Griggs

Willard Griggs is the only Rensselaer County Sheriff Deputy to ever have died in the line of duty.  He was mortally wounded on an East Greenbush farm in 1869 during an Anti-Rent incident. This course will provide an overview of the Anti-Rent war in Rensselaer and Albany counties, and one of its key players, Walter Church, the grandson of Angelica Schuyler. It will discuss the incident in which Griggs was wounded and the unprecedented court proceeding leading up to the trial for his murder.  The outcome of the trial and its aftermath will be discussed.

Jill Knapp, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 110

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

The Death of Rensselaer County Sheriff's Deputy Griggs
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 3/23
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-399 600 8 seats left $15

The Erie Canal: Part of Our History

This presentation with Tom Ragosta, president of the Watervliet Historical Society, curator of the Society’s museum, and city of Watervliet historian, will answer any questions you may have about the Erie Canal. Learn about what it was, what its purpose was, why it was built in New York State, and the statistics on both the original canal and the enlarged version of the canal. You’ll learn about the canal’s impact on the city of Watervliet through pictures and documentation, and a six-foot model of an Erie Canal boat and associated artifacts will be on display.

Tom Ragosta, Instructor

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 112

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

The Erie Canal: Part of Our History
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 5/4
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-612 600 0 seats left $20Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

The Mansion to Mansion Tour

Step back in time with local author and Victorian historian Dr. Hollis Palmer as he tells the story of the families who built the majestic houses on Saratoga’s Union Avenue. We will even have the opportunity to go inside two of the grand mansions. The tour begins at 55 Union Avenue. Once underway, we visit Union Gables, built in 1901 by an orphan who, through his personal drive, became one of the largest merchants in the village. We’ll then stroll down Union Avenue toward the Saratoga Race Track, learning the history of the families who built the houses and would call them home. Our next look inside a mansion is at Saratoga Dreams, built in the 1880’s. Hear how the house was originally designed and why the floor plans were changed before it was completed. The walking tour is 90 minutes and students will receive a copy of one of Dr. Palmer’s books. Course fee includes $25 materials fee.

Dr. Hollis Palmer, Instructor

Paula Johannesen, Coordinator

The Mansion to Mansion Tour
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Friday, 4/23
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
ZCCR-641 600 0 seats left $35Section Full

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The Transcontinental Railroad

Completed in 1869, the transcontinental railroad was the largest infrastructure project in American history at the time it was built, turning the United States into a true continental power and sparking the development of our “wild west.” But did you know that many of the prime movers in the project had ties to early railroading in the Capital Region, and our local industrial base provided a number of the necessary parts that made the project possible? Come learn about the history of the transcontinental railroad and its ties to our area in this one-of-a-kind class.

Michael Barrett, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

The Transcontinental Railroad
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Friday, 4/30
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-627 600 0 seats left $25Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

The Trial of Bat Shea

Jack Casey, a Troy native, graduated from Yale University, where he studied literature and philosophy. After some graduate work in Scotland and travel in Europe, he returned home to write novels of the upper Hudson Valley. His first effort, “The Trial of Bat Shea,” tells the true story of class warfare and a convoluted capital case that resulted in a wrongful execution. Mr. Casey has written this story into a screenplay and a stage play with music that he produced in 2008. Mr. Casey will also play songs on his guitar to dramatize themes of the story. Retiring after 35 years in politics, Mr. Casey practices law from a townhouse in downtown Troy.

Jack Casey, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

The Trial of Bat Shea
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 4/22
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
ZCCR-423 600 9 seats left $22

The United States Colored Troops In The Civil War

This will be a two-part presentation. The first section will be an overview of the role that African Americans played in the armed forces from the early days of the country up to the Civil War.  The second portion will cover the United States Colored Troops (official name), or "USCT", in the Civil War, focusing on some battles, including the Battle of New Market Heights. 

Jim Cochran, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

The United States Colored Troops In The Civil War
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 4/29
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-639 600 3 seats left $12

Ther German Community in Rensselaer County

Join Rensselaer County and Troy City Historian Kathryn Sheehan for this illustrated lecture about the history of the German community. From the Palatine Germans settling in Brunswick in the 18th century to the founding of Germania Hall in Troy, to the impact of the German born Jewish immigrant farmers who settled in Nassau, we will explore this varied and important history of the German residents of the county.

Kathryn Sheehan, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112 

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

Ther German Community in Rensselaer County
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/27
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-640 600 0 seats left $15Section Full

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When Irish Eyes Are Smiling

The Irish people are known for their story telling, poetry and song. It seems that every aspect of life in Ireland has been captured and recounted. Many of the familiar tunes concerning Ireland’s history, love of and between its people and hardships will be presented by the Capital Region’s own “Irish Don Kelly.” Attend this class and hear the backstory to many of the songs. Singing along is encouraged.

Don Kelly, Instructor

Course will meet in Williams Hall, Room 112

On-Campus Health Screening Process 

When Irish Eyes Are Smiling
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 3/25
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-636 600 8 seats left $15

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Community and Professional Education

Guenther Enrollment Services Center, Room 252

Fax: (518) 629-8103

Regular Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Summer Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
(excluding college holidays and vacations)